My Cheap Macro Date

Lately, I’ve been asked what kind of camera and lens do I use — especially for my macro shots. When I bought my Nikon D90 camera as a kit, it came with a couple of lenses and a few filters. The standard Nikkor 18-55mm and Nikkor 70-300mm. One of the filters was a screw on macro. I thought about Nikon’s 105 mm micro but at $900, it was out of my budget. So, I decided to make the best of my cheap $10 screw on Macro filter. And you know what? While the macro filter might not take the sharpest photos and the focus is a constant challenge, I am very impressed by the images I can capture with this filter. Because of its limitations, it constantly challenges my skills. The focus distance for the filter is about 4 or 5 inches, so I have to shoot really close to my subject; this is when good eyes, quick timing and patience are crucial to getting a focused shot.

These photos were taken yesterday at the community garden in Marymoore Park. It’s the same garden I was at last weekend — when I conquered my nemesis. It was a great date with Macro. I shot these in RAW, using the Nikkor 18-55mm lens. I find that the macro filter works better on this lens than the 50mm prim lens. By shooting in RAW, I didn’t have to do much processing, other than adding some sharpness and contrast, adjusted lighting, and some cropping. Overall, I’m very satisfied with the results. Of course it is still my dream to have the 105mm micro but for now… I’m happy with my cheap Macro dates.

I’m not sure what this green bug was. It looked like a bee but I’ve never seen a green bee before — then I thought maybe this is a green hornet? Does anyone have any idea what it might be? Well, whatever it was, it couldn’t have landed on a better color flower. It’s bright green color was a perfect contrast against the red background.

I don’t know if the hair on this bumble bee is as soft as it looks but I do know the sting hurts like your skin is on fire! I was stung by one last summer.




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